Why Christians should not celebrate Halloween

This was taken from an article see all information below.

https://wsimag.com/culture/58292-why-christians-should-not-celebrate-halloween

Halloween is a devil’s holiday, not a Christian observance

25 OCTOBER 2019, NILA ESLITHalloween 

The founder of the church of Satan said that by dressing up, either by wearing a costume or coloring oneself for Halloween, is tantamount to worshipping the devil.

Anton LaVey, the founder of the church of Satan, himself declared that by dressing up, either by wearing a costume or by coloring oneself in celebration of Halloween, signifies that you allow Satan to own you. He further said that when you adopt the pagan practices, you subconsciously dedicate yourself to the devil. He took joy in Christians who take part in the tradition, saying:

I am glad that Christian parents let their children worship the devil at least one night out of the year. Welcome to Halloween.

LaVey’s statement is corroborated by a former Satanist, John Ramirez, who said that when you dress up even as an angel or a mermaid for Halloween, “you give the devil the legal rights to change your identity.” Ramirez further warned that there’s a much darker reality in Halloween beyond costumes and candy. The former Satanist turned Christian pastor said in an interview on CBS News (October 20, 2018):

I was a general to the kingdom of darkness in witchcraft. I would sit with the devil and talk to him like I’m talking to you today. It was that kind of communication. It was that kind of relationship.

Christian teaching

With more than 2.2 billion adherents, Christianity comprises about 31.50% among all the organized religions in the world. And, based on a CBN News Facebook survey, 87% expressed that Christians should not celebrate Halloween, while 13% believe that there’s no problem celebrating it.

Christians are taught to be the light of the world. In one of the Scripture passages, we are instructed thus:

You are the light of the world. A city set on a mountain cannot be hidden. Nor do they light a lamp and then put it under a bushel basket; it is set on a lampstand, where it gives light to all in the house. Just so, your light must shine before others, that they may see your good deeds and glorify your heavenly father.

(Matthew 5:14-16)

Therefore, Christian believers have the moral responsibility to educate their children regarding the evil that comes with Halloween pumpkins, costumes, and the Trick-or-Treat tradition. Adults should likewise lead by example to the young ones.

Halloween history

The origin of Halloween can be traced back to the Celtic festival of Samhain. It’s a tradition held at the end of summer when sacrifices were made to the gods in Druid tradition. The adherents believed that Samhain, the god of death, scattered evil spirits during this time throughout the world to attack humans. These evil spirits play nasty tricks as soon as the dark winter and the waning of the sun set in. 

To escape the attack, humans would assume disguises and make themselves look like evil spirits, too.

Halloween is also the favorite time of year for witches, or the advocates of Wicca. Wicca is the official religion of witchcraft. Wiccan adherents believe that on the night of October 31, the separation of physical and spiritual realities is at its thinnest and least guarded. And so, it’s the best time for those who have necromantic abilities to speak to the dead.

Pagan Halloween and Christian tradition

As Christianity spread through Europe, it came into conflict with the indigenous pagan beliefs. The organized church basically challenged the established customs by trying to introduce Christian alternatives. Although Christianity gained some converts, many were adamant. And so, the missionaries succeeded only in “Christianizing” pagan rituals. They were only able to introduce Christian symbols and practices to the pagan traditions, like the All Hallows Eve remembrance. 

The missionaries injected the All Saints’ Day concept into the pagan Halloween celebration. They introduced the evening before All Saints’ Day as All Hallows Eve, when the time of solemn remembrance of the martyrs begins. The term was derived from “Hallowed”, which means holy. All Hallows Eve was shortened to “Hallow-e’en”, which eventually became “Halloween” over the years. The only difference between the two practices is that the early Christians’ observance of the Halloween never involved wearing costumes. It was rather a solemn event focused on prayer and meditation.

Sadly though, the pagan practices held a remarkably strong influence that some of the new converts were unable to abandon their old customs altogether. Over the years, other Christians adopted those customs, too. Besides, commercialization came into play. Thus, the practice of trick-or-treat, costumes, adornments, and make-up or body coloring is very much alive even up to the present.

Call to action

Christians are actually capable of reversing the evil of Halloween if, and only if, each one would live by the teachings of the One on whom they profess their faith. Parents should teach their children the appropriate way to commemorate All Saints Day.

Nila EslitNila Eslit is a Philippine-based freelance content writer, editor, and copywriter. She also writes book reviews. She received a baccalaureate in Mass Communication from St. Theresa’s College, Cebu, Philippines

I Grew Up Catholic Thinking I Was A Christian…………

The church doesn’t save you the Lord does. I’m grateful for my Catholic heritage giving me the form of God but, they never connected me to him. It took a near death experience to bring me to realize I wasn’t Christian after all. Unless, your church encourages you to read your bible or walk in holiness it’s not a church under God. I say that because the bible says it.

I’m working on my book so I don’t have time to elaborate, I found this blog with an example of a Biblical Church please read-

Donald Miller ruffled quite a few feathers when he recently wrote on his blog that he doesn’t regularly attend church.

While I disagree with much of what he said, I won’t parse through every point. Others have already done that. But Miller said one thing that bothered me very much. Actually he said two things, but they were part of the same point. His point was that the Bible does not give us specific instructions as to what church should look like, which therefore means that no one can really claim to attend a “biblical” church.

The reason this statement bothered me so much is that it is so blatantly false. To claim that the Bible doesn’t tell us what church should look like is to ignore many, many very clear scriptures. To claim that the Bible doesn’t tell us what church should look like also allows a person to substitute his own preferences for the clear teaching of scripture, which Don Miller seems to do at numerous points in his blog post.

So what does the Bible have to say about church?

1. A biblical church involves at least two people gathering together in the name of Jesus. “For where two or three are gathered in my name, there am I among them” (Matthew 18:20). Working with a client on a team building exercise, while valuable, is not church. Church consists of believers coming together, in the same physical space, in the name of Jesus Christ. To gather together in the name of Jesus means gathering together to publicly worship Jesus, serve Jesus, and help others love Jesus. If you’re not gathering together with other believers in the name of Jesus, don’t call yourself a church.

2. A biblical church celebrates the Lord’s supper together. 1 Corinthians 11:23–26 says, “For I received from the Lord what I also delivered to you, that the Lord Jesus on the night when he was betrayed took bread, and when he had given thanks, he broke it, and said, ‘This is my body which is for you. Do this in remembrance of me.’ In the same way also he took the cup, after supper, saying, ‘This cup is the new covenant in my blood. Do this, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of me.’ For as often as you eat this bread and drink the cup, you proclaim the Lord’s death until he comes.”

Jesus commanded his followers to regularly come together to remember and celebrate his death. This is a command, not an optional add-on for the Christian life. This isn’t about preference or opinion or “connecting with God” (a phrase Miller likes to use). The Lord’s supper is a communal event in which the church publicly proclaims the death of Christ. While not expressly forbidden, there isn’t a single place in scripture where a person celebrates the Lord’s supper by themselves. A biblical church celebrates the Lord’s supper. If you’re not celebrating the Lord’s supper with other believers, don’t call yourself a church.

3. A biblical church is led by qualified elders. In Titus 1:5–9, Paul said to Titus: “This is why I left you in Crete, so that you might put what remained into order, and appoint elders in every town as I directed you—if anyone is above reproach, the husband of one wife, and his children are believers and not open to the charge of debauchery or insubordination. For an overseer, as God’s steward, must be above reproach. He must not be arrogant or quick-tempered or a drunkard or violent or greedy for gain, but hospitable, a lover of good, self-controlled, upright, holy, and disciplined. He must hold firm to the trustworthy word as taught, so that he may be able to give instruction in sound doctrine and also to rebuke those who contradict it.”

Paul insisted that the churches he founded be led by qualified elders. This was so important to Paul that he left Titus behind in Crete for the express purpose of finding and appointing qualified elders for each church. In our post-modern, democratic society, the idea of eldership isn’t especially popular, but it is especially biblical. If you’re not being led by qualified elders, don’t call yourself a church.

4. A biblical church worships in song together. Ephesians 5:18–21 says, “And do not get drunk with wine, for that is debauchery, but be filled with the Spirit, addressing one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing and making melody to the Lord with your heart, giving thanks always and for everything to God the Father in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, submitting to one another out of reverence for Christ.”

Notice that this passage has both a vertical and a horizontal dimension to it. We are to be filled with the Spirit, making melody in our hearts to the Lord. We are also to address one another with our psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs. Singing isn’t just about you connecting to God or experiencing a particular emotional response. When the church gathers to sing we are also proclaiming truth to one another. Honestly, God isn’t primarily concerned with whether or not we like singing or emote when we worship. He is concerned that we proclaim his goodness and glory to Him and to one another through song. If you’re not singing to the Lord and to one another, don’t call yourself a church.

5. A biblical church maintains corporate holiness through church discipline. Matthew 18:17 says, “If he refuses to listen to them, tell it to the church. And if he refuses to listen even to the church, let him be to you as a Gentile and a tax collector.” The church really is a place of spiritual protection. Jesus expects his followers to help one another pursue holiness. If a Christian begins to engage in serious sin, Jesus expects the members of his Christian community to lovingly rebuke him. If the person refuses to repent of his sin, the entire church is expected to get involved.

This process presupposes that a Christian will be vitally connected to other Christians. The reality is, the process of discipline can’t happen apart from a local church. If you’re not maintaining holiness through church discipline, don’t call yourself a church.

6. A biblical church is a place where Christians can use their spiritual gifts to bless one another. 1 Corinthians 14:26 says, “What then, brothers? When you come together, each one has a hymn, a lesson, a revelation, a tongue, or an interpretation. Let all things be done for building up.”

In writing this verse, Paul was clearly assuming that the Corinthians would be gathering together on a regular basis in the name of Jesus for the purpose of worshiping together. When they gathered together, they were to use their spiritual gifts to build one another up. It is impossible to build other Christians up if you’re not regularly gathering together with other Christians in the context of corporate worship. If you’re not using your spiritual gifts to build other Christians up, don’t call yourself a church.

Contrary to what Donald Miller says, attending church is not about tribalism, or learning styles, or opinion, or preference. Attending church is a matter of obedience.

And there really is such a thing as a biblical church.

You Can’t Have God Like Burger King Your Own Way.

So many try to add or take away from the word 

 

Proverbs 30:5,6 

Every word of God is pure: he is a shield unto them that put their trust in him. Add thou not unto his words, lest he reprove thee, and thou be found a liar.

 

Now at Burger King you can have it your own way but with the word of God you need to read and heed.  In all our ways acknowledge God, not find a way to get around him.

If churches aren’t transforming people they are deviating from the word.

There’s no formula or program it’s just word we follow.

Welcome to my first blog!

I hope you will enjoy reading. I’ll take you through my journey of life and share things I find interesting.

Let me start by telling you my life is dedicated to God. Not in any way saying I’m perfect but abiding in him I am 😉

Please listen to a radio show I did sharing my testimony to get to know me.

Glad to have you here come back often! https://www.facebook.com/Destinedtine