You Are What You Eat,Are You A Beaver’s Butt?

After drinking your nestles coco or Pepsi drink, do you say oh baby! You might as well because they put a flavor enhancer in it made from aborted babys. There’s also a red coloring that comes from a bug. So you’d be a buggy baby if you were what you ate.

One never knows what’s inside of things until we investigate. So here we go!

Do you like the taste of beavers butt? Well, apparently you do or they wouldn’t keep putting it in your protein shakes and anything with imitation vanilla flavoring. Think about how many options there are for vanilla flavor it’s almost endless. Unless it says pure vanilla you’re probably not going to like what I’m going to share with you next. Beaver butts secrete a goo called castoreum, which the animals use to mark their territory. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration lists castoreum as a “generally regarded as safe” additive, and manufacturers have been using it extensively in perfumes and foods for at least 80 years, according to a 2007 study in the International Journal of Toxicology.. Castoreum began to be used in flavorings in the early 20th century, an era when flavor-makers were borrowing freely from perfumers’ toolkits. By the 1960s, it was being used in vanilla and fruity blends; a 1970s flavor textbook praised the “unusual notes” it added to strawberry and raspberry flavors. Castoreum could be found in beverages, baked goods, ice cream, candy, and especially in chewing gum. The Algonquins traditionally dusted their tobacco with dried castoreum, and, in the 20th century, so did cigarette manufacturers like Phillip Morris and RJ Reynolds; it gave Camels and Winstons a distinguished, luxe aroma. So unless your vanilla says pure vanilla extract you might have eaten from a beavers butt crack.

Yes in the ice cream cone you licked too, icky poo literally.

Sources with lists of products you might want to avoid:

Which Companies Are Using Aborted Human Fetuses in Their Food? Click the link below and open up the article following.

https://www.cctvcambridge.org/node/194279